THE CANADIAN THEOSOPHIST

Vol. 70 No. 6 Toronto, Jan.-Feb, 1990

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The Theosophical Society is not responsible for any statement in this Magazine, unless made in an official document.

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VOYAGE WITH MME. BLAVATSKY

Boris de Zirkoff's Chronoligcal Survey in H.P. Blavatsky Collected Writings II, p. xxxi, records that on May 7, 1880, H.P. Blavatsky, Col. Olcott, Damodar and several other Theosophists embarked for Ceylon on the British India coasting steamer S.S. Ellora. Recently, Australian Theosophist John Cooper gave the editors a copy of a newspaper clipping reporting one passenger's recollections of an extraordinary incident on that voyage.

The clipping is from the May 11, 1891 Philadelphia Inquirer. Marked "Special to the Inquirer," it bears the headline "Voyage with Mme. Blavatsky" and a sub-heading which reads, "The Summary Manner in Which She Silenced a Skeptical First Officer." It reads as follows.

"NEW YORK, May 10. A man who has traveled a good deal in the East, related to an Evening Sun reporter an entertaining story of an experience he had with Mme. Blavatsky during a voyage down the west coast of India. He said: "Early in May, 1880, I took passage from Bombay for Colombo in Ceylon, on one of the comfortable little coasting steamships of the British India Navigation Company.

"The fun of the trip consisted in the delight that the old woman took in making life miserable for the first officer of the vessel, a huge, raw-boned, awkward Scotchman, with fiery red hair and whiskers, and an inborn hatred of anything in the way of religious belief that deviated an iota from the faith of his own Presbyterian church.

"From the very first hour after sailing from Bombay harbour the first officer had wrangled with Mme. Blavatsky in argument until at last he openly declared he believed she was the only daughter of the Father of Lies, and added that he prayed to heaven that the ship bearing such an unholy person might reach port in safety. For his part he doubted it, but he prayed it might be so. This expression of the sturdy mark timer's opinion only caused the old woman to shake with laughter. Finally, one evening as we sat over the coffee and raisins after dinner she told him that she was weary of his pig-headed disbelief in her powers to force natural laws to assist her in performing what he was pleased to call showmen's tricks, and that she meant to teach him then and there to hold his tongue.

"'Vera well, madame, do it if ye can. I'm sure y're truly welcome to try,' he replied with a sneer.


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"'Have you a handkerchief in your pocket?' she asked.

"He unbottoned his coat and handed her his handkerchief, a plain cotton one with a narrow blue border.

"Mme. Blavatsky tossed it on the table in front of her, pushed away her plate, coffee cup and glasses and pulled her chair in as close to the table as she could. I was sitting directly beside her, and watched her with the greatest interest, as, indeed, did all the rest, the first officer looking on from his place at the foot of the table, only a few feet away, with a very plain sneer on his rugged face.

"Having cleared the space in front of her she placed both elbows on the edge of the table, picked up the handkerchief and began to roll it into as small a compass as she could. Then having done so, she squeezed it in her two fists until she turned scarlet in the face and then almost purple. The perspiration started out on her forehead and ran down her face and neck, but still she squeezed harder and harder, with her eyes tightly shut, and as we watched her an expression of pain came on her face, and the color rapidly faded away until she was as livid as a corpse.

"I suppose all this occupied two minutes, certainly not more, and then she opened hers hands and gasped as if her throat were parched from thirst. Col. Olcott motioned us to be silent, and in a few moments she opened her eyes and a faint color came back to her face. She made an effort to speak, but could only whisper, 'Give it to him, at the same time pointing to the handkerchief. It was handed to the Scotchman, who looked somewhat anxious as he opened it and utterly astounded when he found his monogram most exquisitely embroidered in the centre, the letters being in white silk, and enclosed in a circle of light blue of the same color as the printed border of the handkerchief. The diameter of the circle was about two inches.

"For a moment the first officer looked intently at the monogram, then at the pale but triumphant old woman who was gazing at him with blazing eyes, and then he uttered a mighty oath and walked away to his cabin on the forward deck. During the rest of the voyage he would not come near her, speak to her, nor sit at the table while she was there, and the only thing he would say about the affair was to repeat the hope that the vessel would be permitted by Providence to reach Ceylon in safety."

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The same voyage is mentioned in Col. Olcott's Old Diary Leaves. He too described a phenomenon involving embroidery, but considerably different in many aspects to that given above.

When he came to write his memoirs, Olcott recalled this voyage as an enjoyable break for the early Theosophists. He added an anecdote which appears below, of yet another incident involving Madame Blavatsky. (It should be noted that the First Officer of a British merchant vessel in those days was not the Captain, but the next in command. Readers should therefore not equate the character of the following story with that of the first.)

"The old Captain was a fat, good-natured person without the glimmering of a belief in things spiritual or physical. He used to joke with H.P.B. on our notions with such a delicious ignorance of the whole subject that it only made us laugh. One day she was playing her favourite, solitary game of Patience, when the Captain broke in upon her meditations with a


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challenge that she should tell his fortune with the cards. She at first refused, but at last consented, and, making him cut, laid out the cards on the table. She said, "This is very strange: it can't be so!" "What?" asked the Captain. "What the cards say. Cut again." He did so, and with the same result, apparently, for H.P.B. said the cards prophesized such a nonsensical thing that she didn't like to tell him. He insisted; whereupon she said that the cards foretold that he would not be much longer at sea; he would receive an offer to live ashore, and would throw up his profession. The big Captain roared at the idea, and told her that it was just as he anticipated. As for his quitting the sea, nothing would please him more, but there was no such good luck in store for him. The thing passed off without further remark beyond the Captain's repeating the prophecy to the Chief Officer, through whom it became the laugh of the ship. But there was a sequel.

"A month or two after our return to Bombay H.P.B. received a letter from Captain Wickes, in which he said he owed her an apology for his behaviour about the card prophecy, and must honestly confess that it had been literally fulfilled. After dropping us at Ceylon, he continued his voyage to Calcutta. On arrival, he had the offer of the appointment of Harbour Master (Port Officer) at Karwar (I think it was, or if not, then Mangalore) had accepted it, and had actually returned as passenger in his own ship! This is a specimen of, a great many card prophecies H.P.B. made. I do not suppose the cards had anything to do with it save that they may have acted as a link between her clairvoyant brain and the Captain's personal aura, thus enabling her clairvoyant faculty of prescience to come into play. Yet, psychically endowed as she was, I scarcely remember her having foreseen any one of the many painful events that happened to her through treacherous friends and malicious enemies. If she did, she never told me or anybody else so far as I ever heard. A thief stole something she valued once, at Bombay, but she could not find out the culprit, nor help the police whom she called in."

- Old Diary Leaves II, 154-155

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"ENDEXOTERIC" DEFINITION WANTED

How would you define the term "endexoteric?"

H.P. Blavatsky used this word in the following sentence:

"Causes and effects are esoteric, exoteric and endexoteric so to say." (S.D. II, 73-74)

"Endexoteric" is not in any dictionary we have been able to consult. Its meaning was the subject of a reader's query in the Secret Doctrine Question and Answer Section, C.T. Vol. 61, p. 93. In his response, Geoffrey Barborka could not offer a definition, but directed the student to seek for its probable meaning in those pages of Isis Unveiled and The Secret Doctrine to which the above quotation pertains.

C.T. readers are invited to write a dictionary-type definition of "endexoterc" which is suitable to the context in which H.P.B. used it. A copy of Roy Mitchell's The Exile of the Soul will be sent to the writer of what the editors judge to be the best submission. The deadline is April 15, 1990. Please address entries to The Editors at 2307 Sovereign Crescent S.W., Calgary, Alberta, Canada. T3C 2M3.

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STUDIES IN EARLY AMERICAN THEOSOPHICAL HISTORY

- Michael Gomes


IV. COLONEL OLCOTT AND THE AMERICAN PRESS: 1875


Recent research suggests that the most dramatic change in this early American period is in the way Colonel Olcott is to be viewed. While H.P.B. has appeared as the dominant figure, it was Olcott whom the public of the 1870s identified as "the principal leader of the 'occult movement'" (Editorial comment, Religio-Philosophical Journal, Nov. 11, 1875, p. 70). Until the publication of Isis Unveiled in 1877, H.P.B.'s philosophical expositions were mainly limited to the small audience of the Spiritual Scientist. By the time the public could get the book's second edition, read through its 1,200 pages, and form any conception of its author, she was ready to leave for India.

It was Olcott who was frequently referred to in the press, labeled the "Hierophant" and "Col. Occult" because of his identification with the new Theosophical movement as the Society's President, its most vigorous lecturer, and one of its most prolific apologists. If we take the formative year of 1875 as an indicator, he had 27 published pieces, including a major book, as compared with the 12 articles by H.P. Blavatsky.

At the beginning of 1875, the 42-year old lawyer was a well known New York figure through his weekly illustrated articles in the Daily Graphic recounting his experiments with the Eddy mediums, Horatio and William. The series from the Eddy farmhouse in Vermont, which ran from September 29 to December 11, 1874, was a popular one, and when one of the installments failed to appear, the paper received letters inquiring "is it to diminish the sale of the Tuesday issue?" ("Trinity Student," Hartford, to the editor, New York Daily Graphic, Oct. 17, 1874, p. 777).

When the Graphic's literary column announced that Olcott's articles in the paper would be published in book form, it recommended him as "in many respects particularly fitted to investigate the subject, being a man of large experience in detecting fraud and subterfuge. For a number of years he was in the service of the government, engaged in bringing to light dark practices of men swindling the revenue department, and here he was so successful as to win the expressed approbation of his superiors. He is a man of carefully trained judgement, sceptical by nature in regard to such 'materializations,' and conse-

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copyright, 1990 by Michael Gomes

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quently his views are entitled to the most careful consideration of disbelievers" (Nov. 20, 1874, p. 144).

Olcott's output for 1875 in the American press offers a graphic record of his gradual conversion to Theosophy, his position as a leading propagandist, and the development of these new ideas to the public.

After completing his work with the Eddys, Col. Olcott arrived in Philadelphia early in January, 1875, to test the case of Mr. and Mrs. Holmes. He concluded his investigation that month and left for the Hartford, Connecticut firm preparing his articles for publication. We have nothing by him in the press for this first month of the year, though in a letter dated Feb. 4, 1875, from Hartford, he tells General Lippitt that "At Mme. de B's urgent request I sent a letter to the Philadelphia Inquirer outlining my conclusions about the K[atie] K[ing] affair. In it I endorsed the mediumship of the H[olmeses] and said that I left to idle persons to discover how really they and other persons square their lives by the moral law. I was after the genuine manifestations not bogus ones - my quest was scientific not moral" (Adyar Archives). So something may turn up.

Since Olcott defines his work as "scientific" and as he uses the term throughout his writings of this period as a criterion of judgement, what did he mean by it? The findings of scientific men still receive a respectful hearing, and for testing the growing cases of psychic phenomena he was guided by the methods laid down by William Crookes in his 1874 pamphlet Researches in the Phenomena of Spiritualism which stressed the necessity for exact observation. "The first requisite is to be sure of facts; then to ascertain conditions; next laws.

"Accuracy and knowledge of detail stand foremost amongst the great aims of modern scientific men. No observations are of much use to the student of science unless they are truthful and made under test conditions; and here I find the great mass of spiritualistic evidence to fail. In a subject which, perhaps, more than any other lends itself to trickery and deception, the precautions against fraud appear to have been, in most cases, totally insufficient, owing it would seem to an erroneous idea that to ask for such safeguards was to imply a suspicion of the honesty of some present" (Crookes, Researches, rept. in Crookes and the Spirit World, compiled by R.G. Medhurst, 1972, p. 17).


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A similar stress by Olcott, which led to his devising the "foolproof" tests featured in his reports, certainly contributed to the impression that he was a shrewd investigator. The Feb. 13, 1875 Banner of Light commenting on "The Present Status of the Holmes Imbroglio," referred to the Colonel's "reputation of being one of the keenest detectives in the United States." It added his announcement from a private letter to the editor from Hartford, Feb. 2, that he had "proved the mediumship of the Holmeses beyond the slightest doubt," promising "the whole story of my Philadelphia visit will be told in my book, which I shall now complete" (p. 4).

The Colonel found the reference to being a detective offensive, and wrote to the Banner from Allyn House, Hartford, Feb. 13, "For the Lord's sake, stop calling me a detective!... I am not a detective, never was, nor ever will be." His titles upon retiring from his work for the U.S. government were "Special Counsel of the War Department" and "Special Commissioner of the Navy Department" ("A Protest from Col. Olcott," Banner of Light, Feb. 20, 1875, p. 8).

Another letter written from Hartford on February 19 appeared in the Mar. 4 Spiritual Scientist, p. 308, where it is credited to the Times. This must be the Times of Philadelphia, as a check of the New York Times and the Times of London has brought up nothing. Captioned "The American Katie King," the letter gives seven points in the Holmes case which Olcott regarded as having been "solved" by his investigation. It is fascinating to speculate whether Olcott and Mark Twain, who was also in Hartford, and whom Olcott later visited in Calcutta, met at this time. Twain and other writers at Nook Farm where he lived were interested in Spiritualism. Some, like Harriet Beecher Stowe, had experimented with communications for years (see Kenneth Andrews, Nook Farm: Mark Twain's Hartford Circle, Harvard University Press, 1950).

They also shared the same publisher, the American Publ. Co., 149 Asylum Street, in Hartford, which was about to issue Olcott's People from the Other World. His presentation copy to H.P.B., which would have been among the first sent out, is dated from New York, March, 1875. The major part of the book reprinted the Graphic articles profusely illustrated by Alfred Kappes and T.W. Williams. Part Two gave the results of his recent investigation with the Holmses, and a sitting with Mrs. Elizabeth Compton of Havana, New York. The book ran some 475 pages and sold from one to two dollars depending on the quality of the three bindings available. (The Charles E. Tuttle Co., of Rutland, Vermont, issued a beautiful facsimile edition in 1972, and page references are to this printing.)

People from the Other World was well received by the Spiritualist press and the New York dailies that reviewed it. The New York Daily


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Graphic thought it "a book of marvels... testified to by a man of more than ordinary intelligence and predisposed to be scrupulously critical and scientifically exact... And what he narrates runs so counter to experience that it seems absolutely incredible. The most interesting part of this volume to us is the tests which he applied to various phenomena" ("Our Book Table," N.Y. Daily Graphic, April 30,1875, p. 461).

The Colonel's contribution of "well-attested facts," the accumulation of which would force men of science to undertake a systematic investigation of the subject was further upheld when the Graphic printed a letter to Olcott from Alfred R. Wallace, co-discoverer with Darwin of the theory of natural selection. Under "Wallace and Spiritualism," the paper gave Olcott's covering letter and Wallace's to him of May 2, 1875, praising the book's "fair and impartial spirit, as well as its great literary merits," and hoping that the author would have further opportunities of investigating and popularizing this important subject" (Graphic, May 22, 1875, p. 631, rept. in The Theosophist, August, 1932).

The Spiritual Scientist reprinted the chapter from People from the Other World on the mediumship of Mrs. Compton in the April 8 issue, pp. 49-50. The front page of April 29th carried his unsigned "Important to Spiritualists" circular "For the Committee of Seven, Brotherhood of Luxor," stating that the paper had been chosen as the means of disseminating a more philosophical approach to Spiritualism than previously given. The impact of the acronym created by the first letter of each paragraph which so impressed Olcott is lost in the Scientist printing as the text is broken into two columns. The reader is directed to the facsimile in HPB Speaks Vol. I; the effect is heightened in the original where the initial letters are in red.

The name Brotherhood of Luxor should be footnoted by H.P.B.'s explanation given years later. "There is a secret body - whose diploma, or Certificate of Membership, is held by Colonel Olcott alone among modern men of white blood - to which that name [BL] was given by the author of Isis Unveiled for convenience of designation, but which is known among Initiates by quite another one." The reason being that "the real names of Master Adepts and Occult Schools are never, under any circumstances, revealed to the profane." This group "having had a branch at Luxor (Egypt), was thus purposely referred to by us under this name alone. This led some schemers to infer that there was a regular Lodge of Adepts of that name..." ("Lodges of Magic," Lucifer, Oct. 1888; rept. B:CW X, 125-26).

The May 6, 1875 Spiritual Scientist carried his report of a sitting with Mrs. H. Wilson in New York, described by Olcott as being "utterly unsatisfactory in every respect as a scientific experiment" for certain


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precautions were not carried out ("An Abortive Seance," pp. 97-98). Elsewhere I have referred to his contribution of a week later, "Retributive Justice," as his first piece written expressly for that paper, but accuracy demands that this May 6 article be given precedence. Perhaps we can say that the later one was his first philosophical piece, as "An Abortive Seance" breaks no new ground and is still in the category of recording his observations of psychic phenomena.

The same can be said of his letter of May 1, New York, to the Graphic printed May 4, as "From the Other World." Here he describes the foolproof method he devised for securing the medium Mrs. Compton - "a single thread of sewing cotton passed through the perforated lobes of her ears and sealed with wax to the back of the chair." He also mentions that a "Miracle Club" is being organized by some leading New Yorkers who have secured the services of a private medium (p. 487).

"Retributive Justice" in the May 13, 1875 Scientist (rept. in The Canadian Theosophist, Mar-Apr 1989) may well be the earliest public statement in modern Theosophical literature of the law of personal responsibility for one's actions. This was followed by two letters drawing on his recent experiences, one in the Banner of Light, May 22, pointing out that the crude ways of binding mediums during public seances were sometimes injurious to the person tied up ("A Letter from Col. Olcott," p. 8, dated May 16, N.Y.); and another to the Spiritual Scientist stressing the necessity of holding sittings under test conditions and describing the ways the medium could cheat ("Frauds and Tests," Letter to the editor, June 3, 1875, p. 54).

Olcott's June 12 letter to the Banner of Light replying to a spiritualist critic, Thomas Hazard, revealed that he was now "satisfied that in many cases elementary spirits (who are utterly devoid of conscience, and full of malice towards us), compel mediums to cheat, and even, failing this, assume the shape of doppelgangers, to confuse and disturb the circle of investigators." The "most obscure Arab Sheikh and tattered Hindoo Brahmin" were "superiors" in deciphering the true nature of spirit communications and would remain so "until we acquire this alphabet of mystical science" ("A Word with Mr. Hazard," p. 8). The two new ideas introduced here are the possibility that seance phenomena could be caused by forces other than the departed and moulded to suit the participants by the non-human elementary forces through the doppelganger, the astral double of the medium.

"A Phenomenal Memory" written expressly for the Scientist, June 19, reviewed a paper read by G. Harris on "The Psychology of Memory" at the May 20 meeting of the Psychological Society of Great Britain, and gave examples of some prodigious feats of recollection. "A Card to the American Public" in the July 8 Scientist carried the notice that Olcott


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and H.P.B. had been requested by the Hon. Alexander Aksakov to forward applications of mediums who were willing to travel to Russia to be tested by a Committee of the Imperial University of St. Petersburg. Inquiries could be addressed to them care of the editor, E. Gerry Brown, 18 Exchange Street, Boston (rept. B:CW I, 94). A further letter to the July 22 Scientist and sent to all the Boston papers, reiterated that H.P.B. and Olcott alone were empowered to select the mediums to be sent to the St. Petersburg scientists ("What Are You Going to Do About It?" rept. B:CW I, 120).

(To be continued.)

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SONG OF THE DANANN CHILDREN


The Danann children wait and wait, for what is time to them?

They play with golden baubles and sing to Heroes gone;

They sing of their tasks in a light-hearted way,

And dance as only Dananns can,

Around where Sacred Arches stand, that are the goals of men.

For whoso passes under meets there the piper Pan,

And goes his way rejoicing into the timeless land.


The Tuatha De Danann were the gods of ancient Ireland, the spiritual kings of long lineage. They followed the more ancient Rishis who first came when the great continent of Atlantis had gone under the waters. Their children, and their children's children, have been called by many titles: they have been named The Happy Brood of the Sidhe, The Children of the Dawn and The Unappeasable Host. They exist down the corridors of time from Erin's Golden Age when gods walked with men showing them the arts and sciences that they in turn might know the responsibility of duty and accomplish it in excellence. Those who held true to that high duty have ever been revered down the cycles. That is, except by those who have forgotten the purpose of their coming and have not followed the way those early teachers suggested.

As the Golden Age turned to Silver and then to Bronze, few now have the good fortune to see them. Yet they are ever there, as surely as the sun and stars are there; and it is not only in the golden light of the dawn and in the purple twilight that they can be observed.

In our times, many have challenged themselves to find and see the Danann Children - some reckless ones even putting their trust in the black art, in the hope of coming upon some of their secrets. But such is not to be, for the Children have their own conditions and their own requirements; and you must remember that they are Children of Light, not of Darkness.

In the ancient hymns of the Princes of Dana, this was ever abundantly clear. Still, it is a truism that people tend to fantasize when they speak of the past, and when


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they find out how difficult the requirements are to find the Children they incline to accept a seeming reality that is only of their own imagining.

There are, however, records and descriptions of individuals who have met them. It is their common finding that when the music of the pipes of Great Pan is heard, then of a certainty the Arches are not far distant.

Beyond the Arches lies the timeless land. "But," say all who ask, "how is it possible to function in the timeless?" Apparently spontaneous processes take place there. In other words, there is immediate response to any need which may arise, without the usual course of thought, intention and subsequent action, which is so much a condition here in the present as we know it. Thought, intention and action are one and immediate, almost as if they are fused together.

It also appears that the furious search in which human beings engage at all times of their waking lives is not a part of the scene once the Arches have been passed. Those differences might seem hard to contend with, but, when we learn that there is no partiality there, and that generosity is complete and full, then we realize that there has to be much change in our outlook ere we venture to such a place or condition.


And what does one do to find that path

Where the hosts of Maeve harried the way?

If you ask, you are lost;

If you look, you are done!

That is the puzzle that Niamh posed,

And the answer lies far away, far away.

You see by your heart, you hear by your hand,

You learn the song that the Dananns sing

And you go the ways of old.


Today it is difficult to understand the concept of the Heroes of old. Perhaps we ourselves have partly lost the heroic spirit, and without it cannot comprehend the qualities that constitute the way of the Hero. After all, here today we have removed most of the usual risks of living in the modern world. We buy insurance to cover almost anything that we consider of value so that it can be replaced without further effort. But in the world of the heroic it is not possible to buy such an insurance policy. To date, no one has been able to find an insurance firm that will supply us with a guarantee for ready-made courage, or compassion, or to replenish them when we run out of them.

You cannot ask someone to make a Hero of you. Nor can you really look and take on a situation which requires heroic effort when you have not got the essential qualities at hand to deal with it. As well, if you look for long, the challenge grows all the more awesome. The capacity has to be there, otherwise the cause is lost before the start is made.

It is on record that the courage necessary to challenge the forces that bar the way to the arches of the Children of Danann is that of the Hero. When a man makes his stand in relation to his own self-government, he either wins and is a Hero or fails and loses all sense of his own identity. Then he has to rebuild that identity in such a manner that it is in harmony with his inner Self, ere he mounts the challenge again. To go under the Danann Arches, he has to make just that stand. He has to own

(Continued on page 136)

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NOTES AND COMMENTS BY THE GENERAL SECRETARY

I am pleased to welcome into the fellowship of the Society the following new members: Mr. Deane Russell, of Victoria, member-at-large. Miss Marilyn Bolton and Mr. Larry Taylor, Toronto Theosophical Society.

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I regret to announce the death last September of Rose Sadler. She had dropped her membership a year ago due to being incapacitated by age. She will be remembered by her friends in Victoria Lodge. On behalf of the Society I extend condolences to her relatives and friends.

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I have seen a number of articles in various other Theosophical Magazines over the past year or so, on the matter of changing (or not changing) the Objects of the Society. Amongst many comments on the various parts of the Objects, was a suggestion that the First Object was outdated, since most jurisdictions have outlawed racial discrimination and equalized employment opportunities, etc. But the reality is, although there is, as ever, no discrimination in our Society, there still is in society at large.

A further suggestion for deletion was that, "To investigate... the powers latent in man" should be dropped, because little or nothing was ever done in this department and the development of powers, particularly psychic abilities was actively discouraged; and rightly so, as it can be dangerous, if not just a glamourous waste of time; and that "it was not intended that the Fifth Root Race be psychic" (D.K.); and that the etheric webs are there to protect us, do not erode them, etc. etc. All very valid objections and warnings. However, what seems to have gone unnoticed is that the third object does not say "develop the powers latent in man," but investigate. Now investigation is safe, right and proper, to find out about something, and in this case one would also, in the course of investigating, find out about the dangers of premature development of psychic powers, clairvoyance being probably the most popular and seemingly the most desirable.

But there is a way in which one can develop these desirable powers safely, and certainly most properly, albeit very slowly. These powers are rightfully attained and part of what is earned by taking the third Initiation. Mankind is intended to eventually evolve to the fifth Kingdom in Nature, being the fourth now. The goal of the fourth kingdom, that of graduating to the fifth, is achieved at the fifth Initiation, so it looks like we all will eventually pass through the third Initiation. So, if one wants to be psychic, and have all the other "latent" powers imminent, it would behoove the intelligent student of occultism to commence deliberately as soon as possible, like now, to attain to the third Initiation. Since most of us are working to the first Initiation, or something less than the third, the third Initiation will be several lifetimes ahead. But why not start now, as "a journey of a thousand miles begins with the first step."

The Objects of the Society, which express, as in any organization, its purposes and proper activities, as we have them now (and slightly changed from the original of 1875) have served us well, and this person can see no need for altering them. The intelligent application of these Objects will continue to serve us well for years to come.

By now the perspicacious reader will see that I have come perilously close to trampling on some people's corns. Having come that close I may as well take that step and


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Rannie Publications Limited, Beamsville, Ontario

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trample on some corns: nowhere in the Objects, as they exist now, or in the beginning, does it state that the members are to read, study and accept exclusively the writings of H.P. Blavatsky and a certain few writings of the co-founders. Yet many think and loudly express that such is obligatory, and the defaulters are "Neo", "Pseudo" and all manner of foul phrases. Nowhere in the proposed changes in the various essays over the past year that inspired my comments here, does any author proposing change suggest or recommend that this exclusive list of "proper" writings and doctrines be placed in any rewriting of our Objects.

But the re-presentation of part of the esoteric Ancient Wisdom, as brought forth in more modern terms by Mme. Blavatsky is absolutely essential for the study of occultism, and therefore for our member-students (and also for a guide to that third Initiation), but exclusiveness is not essential. The concept that H.P.B. brought forth the complete last word, and that no other shall ever come forth is patently ridiculous, yet fairly widely held, and I could name names. There has been further revelation after H.P.B.'s physical death, and even she is reported to have predicted it. Let us keep the existing Objects, and intelligently apply them.

And while on the subject of H. P.B.'s important writings, I recall that when I was in college six years ago, in the philosophy course there was a textbook we used on the history of Philosophy, and in the section for the 19th century, there was a page devoted to Mme. Blavatsky as being a great philosopher, bringing forth a system known as Theosophy - really a re-bringing forth, but one should be forgiving to the author of that textbook. I was pleased to see this, for what H.P.B. did bring again to the attention of the West is correctly termed a philosophy, as a philoso-


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phy is not only a way of life but an attitude towards life, which term, a quotation, was used for the title to a very good set of little essays by a former member of the Toronto Lodge (and which book is still for sale by the Blavatsky Institute, he says, using these pages for a sales plug).

- S.T.

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TORONTO LODGE

The Annual Meeting of the Toronto Lodge was held on June 20, 1989. The results of the election of Officers for the coming year were as follows:

President - Barbara Treloar

Vice-President - Catherine O'May

Secretary - John Huston

Treasurer - Donald Keith

Directors - Les Dadswell, Carl Emmanuel, Wilf Olin

- John Huston, Secretary

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CALGARY LODGE

Our regular study meeting on Wednesday, November 22, was "pre-empted" in order that we could enjoy a talk by John Cooper of Australia, who had been visiting the United States and this part of Canada.

From his wide range of lecture topics, the Lodge had chosen "The Buddhism of Nagarjuna" and members and friends listened with interest as John ably introduced his subject, and then went on to discuss it in depth. A discussion period followed, and while refreshments were served, our guest was able to mingle and exchange ideas with those present.

Our usual end-of-month presentation on the following Wednesday was given by Gary Lawrence who took "The Immortals" for his topic. It was a fascinating overall view of the old gods and goddesses, and their contribution to humanity.

As the New Year approaches, with its promise of a new surge of life and growth, we send out our greetings to all fellow students worldwide.

- Doris Davy, Secretary

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EDMONTON LODGE

Members of the Edmonton Lodge continued their study of "Fragments of Occult Truth" when regular study meetings resumed in September. Valuable information which forms the basis of Theosophical concepts, as originally outlined during the early years of the Society, are contained in these articles. Their study was found to have been well worthwhile. We have since returned to The Mahatma Letters to A.P. Sinnett for the fifth year.

Later in September three members attended the Annual Meeting of the Theosophical Society, held in Toronto. This gathering afforded us the opportunity to meet and get acquainted with some of the Toronto and area members. Ernest and Rogelle Pelletier and Laurier Auger wish to thank their Eastern Canadian friends for their kindness and hospitality.

In November we were very privileged to have John Cooper, student of Theosophy, and a lecturer at the University of Sydney, Australia, come to Edmonton for several days. While here, he researched through our archives and also gave a number of lectures.


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His first lecture, on Friday, November 17, was "The Buddhism of Nagarjuna," which detailed various aspects of Buddhist philosophy and traced the rise of Nagarjuna's convictions. The following afternoon John talked on the history of the Theosophical Movement in Australia, incorporating details from his Master of Arts thesis: "The Theosophical Crisis in Australia: The Story of the Breakup of the Theosophical Society in Sydney, 1913-1923." A pot-luck dinner followed and later in the evening an open forum was held. One of the subjects discussed was the definition of "Theosophy." It was soon realized that the word elicits different meanings to different people, and that while numerous synonyms were mentioned, no single interpretation defines "Theosophy" per se. Finally, six "definitions" were arrived at. Three members of the Dharma Study Centre (St. Paul, Alberta) attended this event.

Arrangements were also made for our Australian guest to lecture at the University of Alberta. At an evening class on Monday he spoke on "Aspects of Indian thought and the Influence of Theosophy." Starting with the arrival of the Dravidians and Brahminism, he proceeded to trace the origin and evolution of various schools of Indian thought. He then concluded his lecture with a brief outline of the history of the Theosophical Society, and the influence the T.S. has had in such diverse fields as literature and science.

The following day, John Cooper again lectured at the U of A to an "Introduction to Eastern Religions" class, and spoke on "Indian Religion from the Veda to Yoga." The emphasis was on modern movements that have grown out of the Indian religious systems up to and including the Theosophical Society.

That evening, John spoke to the members of the Edmonton T.S. on "The Story of the Mahatma Letters." Beginning with the first letter, which was received by H.P.B.'s relatives in Russia in 1870, he touched upon circumstances surrounding the receipt of Mahatma letters by various individuals and detailed where this correspondence has since been published. He also stressed the importance of a knowledge of the history of the T.S. in order to understand the context in which these letters appeared.

We are pleased that our efforts to establish a Research Library Centre in Edmonton have already proved valuable. While here, John uncovered information in our archival materials which will come in very useful for him in his work as Editor of the Collected Letters of H.P. Blavatsky. The assistance we were able to provide to him with his latest project was most gratifying. His encouraging words regarding our efforts to date were sincerely appreciated. The talk on "Nagarjuna" was audiotaped; "History of the T.S. in Australia" and "The Story of the Mahatma Letters" were videotaped.

It was a pleasure having John Cooper with us. His knowledge of Theosophy and Theosophical History, coupled with his friendliness and warmth, made his visit a memorable one for members of the Edmonton T.S.

- Rogelle Pelletier, Secretary

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HERMES LODGE

Hermes Lodge opened for the new session in September with a lecture by Andy Schneider entitled "The Applied Wisdom Experience" - a blend of ancient wisdom and modern psychology to bring about a practical spirituality.

We regret to report the death of our member Ray Lacroix on October 13, 1989. Ray was well known to local T.S. members, and well liked. He loved books, and was especially interested in the Nicholas Roerich paintings and writings, so it is fitting that our Librarian, Diana Cooper, has placed the book, The Life and Art of a Russian Master in the Library, dedicated to Ray's memory.

Wednesday evening discussions have been planned around some aspects of the three objects of the Theosophical Society, particularly the study of comparative religion, philosophy and science. The purpose of the Wednesday evening study group is to provide a setting where the members who are unable to come in the daytime can meet and discuss Theosophical subjects as well as to help newcomers learn about Theosophy. So far we have had discussions on Karma, Death and the Afterlife States, Human Principles, and the Chakras, besides videotapes and cassettes on related subjects.

On October 1 we were treated to a beautiful lecture by Fiona Odgren, President of the Victoria Lodge, on the life and works of the Russian composer, Alexander Scriabin. It was a fascinating overview of Scriabin's life and philosophy, including his interest in Theosophy. There were selections from his music to complement the lecture, which was very much enjoyed by the audience.

We understand that our new members' booklet, which is the brainchild of Gladys Cooper and put together by Diana Cooper, has caused quite a lot of interest in various parts of the world.

In the event that the 1990 Section Annual Meeting is held in Vancouver, Hermes Lodge has volunteered to be the host Lodge, and has offered the use of its premises for this purpose, if deemed suitable.

Eva Sharp, Secretary

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KROTONA WINTER-SPRING PROGRAM

The Krotona Winter-Spring program commences on January 13,1990, and continues through May 18 except for one-week breaks in February and April.

Among the courses offered are:

"New Myths for Old" - Stephan Hoeller. "Cosmic Symbols and Personal Transformation" - Rebekah Snyder. "Tools for Transformation" and "Healing Ourselves into Aging and Dying" - Nancy and Roger Elsinger. "The Seven Rays" - Michael Miles. "Transforming Ourselves" - Felix Layton and Mary Jo Kokochak. "Paths to Wholeness"- Willamay Pym. "Contemporary Ethical Issues in the Light of Theosophy" - Diana Dunningham-Chapotin. "The Mystic Path to Self-Realization" and "Studies in the Mahatma Letters" - Joy Mills. "The Necessary Universe" - Hugh Murdoch. "Another Spiritual Path: Integrating Feminine Values" - Beverley Noia. "From Personal to Social Transformation" - Mary Abdill and others. "Understanding Yourself: A Course in Meditation" - Jeanine Miller.

In addition, Saturday, February 24 will be a daylong dialogue with Fritof Capra, Joanna Macy and David Steindl-Rast, entitled "Body, Mind and Spirit: Three Dimensions of


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Knowing." This special event is cosponsored with the Elmwood Institute.

There will also be a Spiritual Retreat, April 9-13. This will be facilitated by Dorothy Abbenhouse, National President of the Theosophical Society in America.

Further information from the Director, Krotona Institute School of Theosophy, 46 Krotona Hill, Ojai, CA 93023, U.S.A.

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SONG OF THE DANANN CHILDREN (Continued from page 130)

up to his own responsibilities, and if the truth be known, he has to establish his own immortality, to vindicate his own being.

Maeve, the great Queen of the tribes, led her hosts on a path lost in the whirling winds and known only to herself. How could anyone else know that path unless they too had that inner sense developed?

You ask the question: "How is it possible to learn the song?" You cannot, unless and until the vast inhibitions you hold on to so dearly have fallen away and you are willing to advance beyond them.


But where does one start, and where does one go?

For the Children of Danann are not to be found,

And time runs deadly slow!

You have to go like you came at first,

Without a thought of all behind;

You must give up your fondest things

Until the past has lost its hold -

Then you will know what the Dananns sing!


The notes of the song are in the heart of everyone, deep and far down, and waiting there in expectation. It is said that they are in potentiality in everything that lives. The way to the Arches is the way of self-awareness, and the perfecting of one's own nature until it fully assumes and is one with the greater Nature. When this process is fully under way, the Danann Children will seem to be just beyond our immediate sight and hearing. They beckon us onwards with their golden carefree laughter. We cannot tell the words of their song as yet, but in our innermost being we know them just as sure as we know ourselves.

- S.E.

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BOOK REVIEWS


Readers' Guide to the Mahatma Letters to A.P. Sinnett. Compiled and edited by George E. Linton and Virginia Hanson. Second Edition. Published by the Theosophical Publishing House, Adyar, 1989. Hardcover, 430 pp.

This is a significantly revised and enlarged version of the original 1972 edition, providing much additional information which is also presented more clearly than before.

As in the first edition, the Guide is arranged in four major sections: 1) Chronology; 2) Study Notes; 3) Alphabetical Notes; 4) Appendices.

In the Chronology section, additional entries in the Letters and Events segment provide pertinent information at a quick glance, as for example, when A.O. Hume started writing the series "Fragments of Occult Truth," although regrettably in this instance, no mention is made of where these particular articles appeared. Missing from this edition,


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however, is the listing of the Letters of H.P.B. to A.P. Sinnett, with their related references. Maps of India with a listing of related events and points of interest, and showing the location of cities and regions mentioned in the Letters are a most welcome addition. These also serve to illustrate the vast distances that had to be contended with in those early days.

The Study Notes section, which provides a description of the physical appearance of each letter, circumstances under which it was received, and references to its details, is the most notably improved section of the book. For example, under M.L. 1 - Circumstances: the location of Simla in relation to New Delhi is described, its elevation, and why prominent personages spent several months of the year there. It goes on to explain why Sinnett wrote to the Mahatma and where K.H. was at the time he wrote this reply. In all, four and one half pages are devoted to this Letter alone, compared to slightly more than two pages of information detailed in the first edition.

Another added feature is the dual page numbering for the First/ Second and Third editions of The Mahatma Letters to A.P. Sinnett. This is used throughout the Guide, but is particularly helpful in this section. Also, the chronological number appears first, followed by the M.L. number in brackets, making it easier to locate information about each Letter with a quick skim of the pages.

In the Alphabetical Notes section, The Mahatmas and Their Letters by Geoffrey A. Barborka has been added as a reference source. There are also a number of additional page references to some of the entries. Two more personages have been included here, and Dr. Vernon Harrison's 1986 reexamination of the 1885 SPR Report has been added under Hodgson, Richard. Sinnett's Occult World and his Phoenix venture are two other new additions.

Three new appendices have been added: G, "Physical Appearance of the K.H. Letters to Sinnett;" H, "Some Incidents in H.P.B.'s Life as Related in the Letters;" I, "The Triumph of Germanicus" (which deals with indications by K.H. "that Sinnett might have been a Flamen or priest in Rome in the early days of the Christian era.")

Facsimiles of selected Letters have also been included in this edition as well as a Summary Chronology of the Letters; and a Cross-Reference of the Mahatma Letters for the second and third editions.

Overall, this information-packed book is a must for any student of the Mahatma Letters. Its 430 pages compare with 308 in the previous edition, which is still more readily available than the new one.

In Edmonton, the members have been doing a concentrated study of The Mahatma Letters to A.P. Sinnett for four years now. This "new and improved" version of the Readers' Guide is especially welcomed here.

- Ernest Pelletier

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Krotona of Old Hollywood, Volume I, 1866-1913, by Joseph E. Ross. Montecito, CA: El Montecito Press, 1989. Hardcover. xiv + 298 pp. Price $22.95 U.S.

The Preface to Krotona of Old Hollywood contains a comment by the author on the unavailability of certain archival materials. He writes, "Much of the material is in the inaccessible archives of the organization or has been purposely destroyed. Portions of the history may be yet too painful, or considered too private, to the source individuals."

This book is a loosely organized presentation of the author's own archival materials,


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that is, letters and documents collected through the years, during many visits to various Theosophical centres. This unusual structure may be considered an expression of his response to the rather lamentable situation described above.

Joseph E. Ross extends a warm invitation to the reader to study his personal archives so that, as he puts it, "...those earnestly seeking the truth may know where to look for it." There are, however, two conditions posted above the entry door! The first is from Radha Burnier in an excerpt from her Presidential Address to the 112th Annual Convention of the T. S., Adyar, Dec. 26, 1987. In it she warns that if we approach Theosophical History with an intent to blame, to judge, to compare characters, or to pronounce failure, then we are at cross purposes with the objectives of the Society. Secondly, Ross suggests that we must "...carefully observe... withhold judgment... learn to discern the subtlest thread linking to the higher Wisdom." Obviously, he hopes that his readers will view this material through nonsectarian eyes, and the expression of this hope is the closest the reader will get to the author's point of view.

Sections of the text have such a ring of authenticity that the reader senses old Minute Books directly transcribed. A counterpoint to this text is created through a series of letters written by Annie Besant, C.W. Leadbeater, C. Jinarajadasa and A.P. Warrington. Through these two parallel lines of thought, Ross traces not only the development of old Krotona but also the history of the American Section of the Theosophical Society (Adyar) during this period. These letters often bear little relationship to the body of the text which develops the Krotona story, while they refer usually to the business of Adyar or the American Section.

The author makes no comment on these letters except to suggest in his Preface that "...they may be important to the larger international scope of the theosophical movement," and that the reader should "...consult other sources of theosophical history for their elucidation." A result of this is that the book often seems disjointed and long-winded, especially since it lacks the unifying effect of a strong point of view.

The real story is created not by Ross himself, but rather through the sometimes stark contrast of tone that exists between the text which develops the Krotona story and the letters. The Adyar officials with their own words create an image of their organization as it existed then. However, it would not be fair to discuss this unwritten story since the author has invested so much trust in his reader, and studiously kept his own opinions out of the book regarding the contents of these materials. He trusts that each reader after close observation, careful consideration, and the elimination of a partisan viewpoint, comes to his own conclusion according to his own lights.

The technical problems in this book are far outweighed by the extreme good faith, generosity of spirit, and courage which have prompted the author to share these materials with the general membership of the Theosophical Movement.

It is not unreasonable to assume that this book was published under some strong protest; let us hope, then, that the general membership has come of age, and can justify the author's good faith by using this material wisely. After all, it is only through a close and careful study of our history that we can ever know ourselves as an organization. When we clearly understand how and why our history has shaped us, then we can finally put it where it belongs: behind us! It is this com-


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plete understanding and assimilation of our past which frees us to move towards a more vibrant and vital future, and it is in this sense that history is our ever present hope. Let us hope also that those individuals and Theosophical leaders who have locked the doors to the archives, or purposely destroyed historical materials, will be encouraged by Ross's example to give us back our history.

- Gay Gering

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Mystery of Mandalas, by Heita Copony. Translated from the German by Gabrielle Bertelmann. With 25 colour plates. A Quest Book, published 1989 by Theosophical Publishing House, Wheaton, IL. Hardcover. 90 pp. Price $18.95 U.S.

Obviously this book was written by an artist. It is a collection of 25 paintings of mandalas, beautiful in form and colour. Heita Copony explains what they mean to her, and in some instances how they came into being. I thought her "Mandala of Healing Colours" particularly full of power. The paintings with human or angelic figures are also beautiful in colour and composition, but I gained more from the abstracts.

The introduction, "The Meaning of Mandalas" could be more complete. A chapter on "The Individual Mandala" touches on psychological factors and the possibility of recognizing these in the process of constructing and studying one's own mandala. They are true magical circles that bring us in touch with our inner selves and can reflect back to us, that is, when we originate our own mandalas. I miss any reference to Carl Jung, whose work on this subject is so important; or anything relating to Wilhem's The Secret of the Golden Flower. The final chapter, "Your Own Mandala Creation" is helpful for beginners.

Some of the concepts and themes used by Heita Copony seem Theosophically sound; others strike me as not quite right, at least according to my understanding.

- Laetitia van Hees

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A READER'S NOTES

With this issue, The Canadian Theosophist completes its seventieth year of publication. Many changes have occurred in the world and in the Theosophical Society since 1920, but some things never change. For instance, in the second issue the Editor, Albert E.S. Smythe, noted that in the absence of a magazine policy he, as General Secretary, had "taken the responsibility of getting out the magazine as a matter of urgency to provide for the self-conscious existence of the Canadian organization." (He was referring to the then newly-formed Theosophical Society in Canada.) He then went on to make an observation which is as timely today as it was when he wrote it: "Criticism is welcome, suggestions are desirable, but good original matter is the one thing needful."

The present Editors echo and re-emphasize that remark. Those readers who do not believe three score years and ten must be the end of everything, and want to see the C.T. continued, should be aware that "good original matter" is still in very short supply. If they are able to contribute they should; if not, they should encourage others.

In this regard, Doris adds that most wanted are short articles - no dusting off of old college essays, please!


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It was a great disappointment to learn that Hermes magazine had ceased publication with its September, 1989 issue. For over 15 years it had set and maintained a high standard both in quality of content and in graphic excellence. Happily, its place is being taken with a new journal from the same source.

Vidya, a magazine of theosophical thought and related topics, is now available from the Universal Theosophy Fellowship, P.O. Box 959, Santa Barbara, CA 93102, U.S.A. The new magazine is published on the first of every other month and is $12.00 (U.S.) per year.

It isn't often that a Theosophical journal offers a "bonus" with a subscription order, but I am told that new subscribers to Vidya who mention this announcement will receive a complimentary copy of the Oxford edition of Dr. Raghavan Iyer's book, Parapolitics.

More good news. Viewpoint Aquarius, whose demise was announced in the Sep-Oct C.T., lives on. Earlier, following the death of Rex Dutta, the VA volunteers stated there would be no further issues. It is a pleasure to announce that they have changed their minds, and have decided "to resume publication and produce a 'modified VA' - basically just the two study sections: Theosophy and Yoga/ Meditation/ Healing."

The new VA will be published six times a year. Subscription is by donation, but prime-only costs, not including postage, will be 50p (about $1.00 Canadian) per issue. As before, all labour is voluntary. A sample issue will be sent on request to P.O. Box 97, Camberley, Surrey, GU15 2LH, England.

- T.G.D.

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VOICE OF THE FOREST


As I came into their domain

I spoke to the cedar trees,

the pine and larch, and cottonwood, and fir

to all the standing dwellers of the forest

to honour them, and seek

to learn from them such wisdom

as could help me in my daily life


At once they answered me.

They spoke

of peace and silence

of reaching ever upward to the sky

of being pliant

so that heavy loads might slide off harmlessly

of constancy, of stillness,

and of simply being who they are

with never shout or trumpet call.

They spoke of symmetry and balance,

of sending long roots

deep into that place wherein they dwell,

of sowing seeds with prodigality

with no attachment to results

and of sharing all they are

with all who come to them


I was but passing through

and yet in that brief space

they gave me gifts beyond compare,

and with full heart

I thanked them.

- Sheila M. Weaver, Sing the Earth

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S.D.Q & A HELD OVER

Lack of space necessitates holding over the Secret Doctrine Question and Answer Section. The series will resume in the next issue. - Eds.

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HOME STUDY COURSE

A Theosophical correspondence course is now available to Canadian readers. It is offered to new students of Theosophy, especially those who are unable to participate in local study groups.

Further information may be obtained by writing The Theosophical Society in Canada, R.R. No. 3, Burk's Falls, Ont. POA 1CO.

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TORONTO THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY TRAVELLING LIBRARY

The Travelling Library of the Toronto Theosophical Society is operating and offering books on loan by mail to Society members only in Canada. Inquiries. to: Toronto Theosophical Society Travelling Library, 109 Dupont Street, Toronto, Ontario M5R 1V4

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"THE SLEEPING SPHERES"

Now available: "The Sleeping Spheres", by Jasper Niemand, with notes by Willem B. Roos. Price $2.00 including postage. Available from: The Canadian Theosophist, 2307 Sovereign Cres. S.W., Calgary, Alberta, Canada T3C 2M3

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CHANGING YOUR ADDRESS?

If you are a subscriber or a member-at-large and are planning to change your address, please send us a change of address card as soon as possible. If you are a member of a Lodge, please advise your Lodge Secretary so that the information may be passed to us. Second class mail is not re-addressed by the post office. - Eds.

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TAPE LENDING LIBRARY

Audio and video cassette tapes of lectures, etc., are available on loan from the T.S. in Canada tape lending library. (This service is for residents of Canada only.) Write for list to: Doris Davy, 2307 Sovereign Cres. S.W., Calgary, Alberta. T3C 2M3.

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THE H.P.B. LIBRARY

c/o M. Freeman, Site No. 19, Comp. No. 2, R.R. 1, Vernon, B.C. V1T 6L4

Comprehensive literature of the Theosophical Movement lent by mail. Catalog on request. The library also publishes the following:

- The Voice of the Silence (Peking Edition)

- Works by Alice Leighton Cleather:

H.P. Blavatsky - A Great Betrayal

H.P. Blavatsky - Her Life and Work for Humanity

H.P. Blavatsky - As I Knew Her

- Works by Alice Leighton Cleather and Basil Crump:

Buddhism - The Science of Life

The Pseudo-Occultism of Mrs. A. Baily.

- Nine "H.P.B. Pamphlets", including early articles from Lucifer.

- Write for price list.

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INDEX - THE CANADIAN THEOSOPHIST, VOL. 70


AE (pseud. George W. Russell) .......1, 3, 34

All of Us Must Die................................... 82

Animals and Earthquakes ..................... 103

Annual Meeting ................................ 59, 107

Annual Report ....................................... 109


Ball, Eunice........................................ 42,63

Barborka, Geoffrey A........ 20, 46, 67, 90, 115

Barr, Dudley W. ......................................97

Blavatsky, Helena Petrovna.................... 26

Initial Spiritualist Response to............. 27

(portrait) ...............................................25

Voyage with ....................................... 121

Braille Edition of S.D.

Q&A Section ........................................ 91

Brown, Elbridge Gerry ............................14

Burnier, Radha.......................................... 4


Calgary Lodge ......13, 39, 63, 64, 85, 111, 133

Carman, Bliss, meets Charles Lazenby.......................94

Chatwin, Doreen .....................................40

Christmas Magic .....................................97

Clairvoyance, Normal .............................. 65

Colombo, John Robert ............................ 21

Comfort, Will Levington........................... 38

Cooper, Gladys................................ 45, 117

Coulsting, Jean .....................................105


Davy, Doris ................ 13, 39, 63, 85, 111, 133

Davy, Ted .........19, 21, 43, 47, 69, 73, 86, 92, 93, 103, 118, 139

Dick, Fred J. .............................................3


Earthquakes ..........................................115

Animals and ......................................103

Edmonton Lodge ........................39, 62, 133

Elder, S............................................ 49, 129

Election Results ............................ 59, 60, 61 "Endexoteric"........................................... 123

Eternal Feminine, The, and the Wisdom-Religion ........... 98


F.J.D. (see Dick, Fred J.)

Fohat.................................................. 20, 46

Fortas, A.N.............................................. 58

Fuller, Jean Overton ...............................38


Gering, Gay ..........................................137

Gilmour, Dorita...................................... 111

Gomes, Michael ...................... 14, 27, 51, 76, 93, 112, 124

Gurus, Views on ...................................105


H.P.B. In Memoriam (poem)................... 26

Hassanein, Suzanne ............................. 111

Healing ............................................... 17,58

Hermes Lodge .....................64, 85, 117, 135

Hooper, Lillian ......................................... 86

Huston, John ......................................... 133


Impressions of the 113th Convention .......8


J. (Mrs. Julia Keightley) ............................2

Journals mentioned:

Hermes.............................................. 140

Holistic Science and Human Values ...47

Protogonos ..........................................47

Theosophical Digest ............................ 11

Vidya .................................................140

Viewpoint Aquarius ............................ 140

Judge, William Q.......................................2


Keightley, Julia .......................................... 2

Key to Theosophy, The ..........................73

Krotona Programs ............................ 70, 135


Lakin, Peter ............................................... 8

Laudahn, William R.................................98

Lazenby, Charles A. ..........................37, 94

Life Atoms .......................................... 67, 90


Magnificent Old Lion ...............................94

Mussallem, Frances Lucas .....................38


Nicholas, Margaret .................................. 37

Normal Clairvoyance ............................... 65

Notes and Comments ................. 11, 35, 59, 83, 107, 131


Obituaries:

Ayoub, Adeline ....................................11

Day, Theo............................................83

Dutta, Rex ...........................................86

Lacroix, Raymond .............................107

Nicholas, Margaret .........................83, 86

Sadler, Rose .....................................131

Schneider, Ida .....................................83

Stephen, Ida........................................ 45

Zuk, Michael ........................................ 83

Occult Astronomy .................................... 43

Olcott, Henry S. ..........................9, 122, 124

and the American Press, 1875.............124

Olin, Wilf .................................................40

One Behind the Scene, The ...................71


Pelletier, Ernest ....................................136

Pelletier, Rogelle......................... 39, 62, 133

Pomeroy, Elsie...................................... 118

Presidential Address ................................. 4

Publishing Centenaries ...........................73


R. (George W. Russell) ..........................26

Ramanuchary, N.C. ................................58

Reader's Notes, A........... 21, 47, 93, 118, 139

Retributive Justice ..................................... 9

Reviews:

Beginnings of Theosophy in France, The............. 93

Compte de Saint Germain, The ..........69

Human and Divine Universe, The .......92

Krotona of Old Hollywood, Vol. 1.......137

Mystery of Mandalas .........................139

Readers' Guide to the Mahatma Letters .......136

Senzar, The Mystery of the Mystery Language .............. 19

Voice of the Silence, The: Centenary Edition ........... 92

When the Snakes Awake .................. 103

Russell, George W....................... 1, 3, 26, 34


Saunders, Henry S. ..............................118

Secret Doctrine Question and Answer Section .....20, 46, 67, 90, 91, 115

Sharp, Eva.................................. 64, 85, 135

Smythe, Albert E.S. ................................82

Song of the Danann Children ...............129

Studies in Early American Theosophical History ......... 14, 27, 38, 51,76, 112, 124

Superstring Theory .................................83


Theosophical Biographies ....................... 58

Theosophical History, Studies in Early American..... 14, 27, 38, 51, 76, 112, 124

Thought Mountain (poem) ....................111

Today's Problems ...................................49

To Felaz.................................................. 71

Toronto Lodge .................................40,133

Treloar, S.................... 11, 35, 59, 60, 83, 107, 109, 131

Triennial Election 1989................. 59, 60, 61


Vancouver Lodge .................................... 40

van Hees, Laetitia................................. 139

Victoria Lodge ............................. 42, 63, 111

Voice of the Forest (poem) ...................140

Views on Gurus ....................................105

Voice of the Silence, The .......................73

Voyage with Mme. Blavatsky................ 121


W.Q.J. (poem) .....................................1, 34

Weaver, Sheila M. .........................118, 140


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--- 144


BRANCH DIRECTORY


BEACONSFIELD STUDY CENTRE: Secretary, Mrs. Suzanne Hassanein, 81 Heritage Rd., Beaconsfield, P.Q., H9W 3V2. (Phone 695-2618 or 697-8198).

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TORONTO LODGE: President, Mrs. Barbara Treloar, Secretary, Mr. John Huston; Lodge Rooms: 109 Dupont St., Toronto, Ont. M5R 1V4 (Phone 922-5571)

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KALEVALA STUDY CENTRE, VANCOUVER: Secretary; Mrs. Hellin Savolainen, 1604 6055 Nelson Ave., B.C. V5H 4L4.

ORPHEUS LODGE, VANCOUVER: President, Mr. Eric Hooper, Sec. Treas. Mrs. Lillian Hooper. (Phone 589-4902 or 731-7491.)

VICTORIA LODGE: President, Mrs. Fiona Odgren; Secretary, Mrs. Dorita Gilmour

ATMA VIDYA LODGE: Secretary, Mrs. H. Tidberry. Enquiries c/o General Secretary.

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